Class notes September 28th 2010


Hey folks, been awhile.

I took the summer off, ostensibly to recharge my batteries, but also to nurse a nagging shoulder injury that pains me to no end. I thought some rest would fix the problem, but it’S not getting better and simply lifting my arms pains my shoulders. Time to see a doc…

Now that my whining is done, let’s look at today’s class.

We had some newcomers, so I went back to basics (always a good idea anyways) with some abrazare poste and footwork.  Specifically the poste dance, and a drill for the passare that forces the student to engage his hips by moving through posta longa.

We examined the uses for the poste and how they conceptualise movement and position in the system.

Then we began some poste applications with the intent to bridge into something else.  The drill was simple:

  1. One player attacks using posta longa (punch or open hand strike) to the face.
  2. The other defends using boar’s tooth (cinghiale), either inside or to the outside, maintaining measure.

This practices footwork, measure and the application of the poste.

Next, we examined balance and its components.  Essentially, moving the hips out from under the shoulders or vice-versa creates an unbalanced condition – structure is broken.  We can also compromise balance in several direction, but all obeying the same basic tenet: you either move across the line between the feet (crossing the “T”) or parallel to it.  This does one of two things: compromises balance by moving to the balance point or shifts weight onto one leg so that it may be attacked or prior to moving to the balance point.

The next drill worked with this principle, specifically moving parallel to the line formed by the feet.

  • Players hold each other in a reciprocal over-under arm hold.
  • Players step forward and back, pulling to one of the diagonals as the Player shift his weight to that foot.  For instance, if the Companion is moving forward onto his left foot, pull forward and to his left (back and you your right).

We then merged the drills thusly:

  1. Companion attacks with posta longa to the face
  2. The Player covers using dente di cinghiale
  3. Controlling the arm, the Player pulls along the line formed by the Companion’s feet, unbalancing him and bringing a hand to bear in posta longa to aid in the technique (double up as it were).
  4. Repeat
This works nicely as a drill along the lines of the feet, so we did the same thing and crossed the line.
  1. The Companion attacks using posta longa
  2. The player covers using boar’s tooth
  3. The Player controls the arm, pulling along the line, then shifts by pushing on the opposite shoulder across the “T” and to the balance point.  Voila, instant takedown,  Stepping through yields a beautiful throw, removing support as the cherry on the sundae (not part of the drill, but worth mentioning here)
More work next week as we repeat this as well as look at new and inventive ways to unbalance someone.